Pic #747

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A Bill Miller @ Saturday, September 24th 2011, 7:14 AM
petri dish
paul @ Saturday, September 24th 2011, 9:21 PM
Nice Emboss Effect!!!
Tom Moody @ Saturday, September 24th 2011, 9:38 PM
Hi, Sabrina,
Your involuntary collaboration with Rick Silva is at
http://www.tommoody.us/archives/2011/09/24/burst-variation/
Sabrina Ratte @ Sunday, September 25th 2011, 11:54 AM
:)
Aaron Harbour - [Homepage] @ Tuesday, December 13th 2011, 6:31 PM
Dear Sabrina,

My name is Aaron Harbour. My partner, Jackie Im and myself are curating an online exhibition titled Two Point Oh for the website Little Paper Planes (http://www.littlepaperplanes.com/). The exhibition will feature work that exists online, accessible via platforms that are sited in the everyday i.e. Google, YouTube, Vimeo, Wikipedia, Facebook and blogs (a full description of the exhibition is below).

We are very interested in featuring your work in the exhibition. We are interested in it's ready availability online and that the works have an existence within well-traveled online circuits. We invite and seek your permission to feature your work in Two Point Oh, yet as a courtesy, I will inform you that we will likely include the work due to it's open viewing nature online.

Feel free to contact us directly via email (Jackie Im: jackieim09@gmail.com or Aaron Harbour: mrharbour@gmail.com).

Thank you for your time.

Best,

Aaron Harbour

The internet has been a site for art since before the now assumed ubiquity of home computing. In the 1990’s and early 2000’s, artists produced net art, often through the means of creating a web page upon which a work or a group of works is sited. While these artists were indeed venturing into new territory, their works were and continue to be challenged with specific limitations – how does one present and maintain a URL? Should the work become archived, does any interactive element then become null and void? Through a combination of institutional exhibition and acquisition, as well as what could be called a short-sightedness of encompassing ubiquity of the internet, many early net art sit as islands in a vast world of websites – rarely visited, stationary and un-linked to.

“Post-internet art,” a phrase coined by artist and curator Marissa Olson and developed by writer Gene McHugh, refers to works in which the internet is not so much a novelty, but rather a banality – a site in which we traverse everyday. The artists in Two Point Oh situate and make use of internet technology that is sited in the everyday – Google Image Search, YouTube, Wikipedia, Vimeo and blogs. These works are in plain sight and/or use tools that are readily accessible, and that act comes with risk: loss of ownership and control of distribution, the mundane limitations of the host website’s interface, commodification of their ‘page views,’ and competition in the form of every other entry on such a space. Yet these works also are rewarded the opportunity to address an audience on their own terms, both temporally and spatially.
Aaron Harbour - [Homepage] @ Tuesday, December 13th 2011, 6:31 PM
Dear Sabrina,

My name is Aaron Harbour. My partner, Jackie Im and myself are curating an online exhibition titled Two Point Oh for the website Little Paper Planes (http://www.littlepaperplanes.com/). The exhibition will feature work that exists online, accessible via platforms that are sited in the everyday i.e. Google, YouTube, Vimeo, Wikipedia, Facebook and blogs (a full description of the exhibition is below).

We are very interested in featuring your work in the exhibition. We are interested in it's ready availability online and that the works have an existence within well-traveled online circuits. We invite and seek your permission to feature your work in Two Point Oh, yet as a courtesy, I will inform you that we will likely include the work due to it's open viewing nature online.

Feel free to contact us directly via email (Jackie Im: jackieim09@gmail.com or Aaron Harbour: mrharbour@gmail.com).

Thank you for your time.

Best,

Aaron Harbour

The internet has been a site for art since before the now assumed ubiquity of home computing. In the 1990’s and early 2000’s, artists produced net art, often through the means of creating a web page upon which a work or a group of works is sited. While these artists were indeed venturing into new territory, their works were and continue to be challenged with specific limitations – how does one present and maintain a URL? Should the work become archived, does any interactive element then become null and void? Through a combination of institutional exhibition and acquisition, as well as what could be called a short-sightedness of encompassing ubiquity of the internet, many early net art sit as islands in a vast world of websites – rarely visited, stationary and un-linked to.

“Post-internet art,” a phrase coined by artist and curator Marissa Olson and developed by writer Gene McHugh, refers to works in which the internet is not so much a novelty, but rather a banality – a site in which we traverse everyday. The artists in Two Point Oh situate and make use of internet technology that is sited in the everyday – Google Image Search, YouTube, Wikipedia, Vimeo and blogs. These works are in plain sight and/or use tools that are readily accessible, and that act comes with risk: loss of ownership and control of distribution, the mundane limitations of the host website’s interface, commodification of their ‘page views,’ and competition in the form of every other entry on such a space. Yet these works also are rewarded the opportunity to address an audience on their own terms, both temporally and spatially.
Aaron Harbour - [Homepage] @ Tuesday, December 13th 2011, 6:32 PM
Dear Sabrina,

My name is Aaron Harbour. My partner, Jackie Im and myself are curating an online exhibition titled Two Point Oh for the website Little Paper Planes (http://www.littlepaperplanes.com/). The exhibition will feature work that exists online, accessible via platforms that are sited in the everyday i.e. Google, YouTube, Vimeo, Wikipedia, Facebook and blogs (a full description of the exhibition is below).

We are very interested in featuring your work in the exhibition. We are interested in it's ready availability online and that the works have an existence within well-traveled online circuits. We invite and seek your permission to feature your work in Two Point Oh, yet as a courtesy, I will inform you that we will likely include the work due to it's open viewing nature online.

Feel free to contact us directly via email (Jackie Im: jackieim09@gmail.com or Aaron Harbour: mrharbour@gmail.com).

Thank you for your time.

Best,

Aaron Harbour

The internet has been a site for art since before the now assumed ubiquity of home computing. In the 1990’s and early 2000’s, artists produced net art, often through the means of creating a web page upon which a work or a group of works is sited. While these artists were indeed venturing into new territory, their works were and continue to be challenged with specific limitations – how does one present and maintain a URL? Should the work become archived, does any interactive element then become null and void? Through a combination of institutional exhibition and acquisition, as well as what could be called a short-sightedness of encompassing ubiquity of the internet, many early net art sit as islands in a vast world of websites – rarely visited, stationary and un-linked to.

“Post-internet art,” a phrase coined by artist and curator Marissa Olson and developed by writer Gene McHugh, refers to works in which the internet is not so much a novelty, but rather a banality – a site in which we traverse everyday. The artists in Two Point Oh situate and make use of internet technology that is sited in the everyday – Google Image Search, YouTube, Wikipedia, Vimeo and blogs. These works are in plain sight and/or use tools that are readily accessible, and that act comes with risk: loss of ownership and control of distribution, the mundane limitations of the host website’s interface, commodification of their ‘page views,’ and competition in the form of every other entry on such a space. Yet these works also are rewarded the opportunity to address an audience on their own terms, both temporally and spatially.
Aaron Harbour - [Homepage] @ Tuesday, December 13th 2011, 6:33 PM
Dear Sabrina,

My name is Aaron Harbour. My partner, Jackie Im and myself are curating an online exhibition titled Two Point Oh for the website Little Paper Planes (http://www.littlepaperplanes.com/). The exhibition will feature work that exists online, accessible via platforms that are sited in the everyday i.e. Google, YouTube, Vimeo, Wikipedia, Facebook and blogs (a full description of the exhibition is below).

We are very interested in featuring your work in the exhibition. We are interested in it's ready availability online and that the works have an existence within well-traveled online circuits. We invite and seek your permission to feature your work in Two Point Oh, yet as a courtesy, I will inform you that we will likely include the work due to it's open viewing nature online.

Feel free to contact us directly via email (Jackie Im: jackieim09@gmail.com or Aaron Harbour: mrharbour@gmail.com).

Thank you for your time.

Best,

Aaron Harbour

The internet has been a site for art since before the now assumed ubiquity of home computing. In the 1990’s and early 2000’s, artists produced net art, often through the means of creating a web page upon which a work or a group of works is sited. While these artists were indeed venturing into new territory, their works were and continue to be challenged with specific limitations – how does one present and maintain a URL? Should the work become archived, does any interactive element then become null and void? Through a combination of institutional exhibition and acquisition, as well as what could be called a short-sightedness of encompassing ubiquity of the internet, many early net art sit as islands in a vast world of websites – rarely visited, stationary and un-linked to.

“Post-internet art,” a phrase coined by artist and curator Marissa Olson and developed by writer Gene McHugh, refers to works in which the internet is not so much a novelty, but rather a banality – a site in which we traverse everyday. The artists in Two Point Oh situate and make use of internet technology that is sited in the everyday – Google Image Search, YouTube, Wikipedia, Vimeo and blogs. These works are in plain sight and/or use tools that are readily accessible, and that act comes with risk: loss of ownership and control of distribution, the mundane limitations of the host website’s interface, commodification of their ‘page views,’ and competition in the form of every other entry on such a space. Yet these works also are rewarded the opportunity to address an audience on their own terms, both temporally and spatially.